Ambitious plans to create a £40m food-lovers’ paradise in the west midlands have collapsed after five years in the making. Backers of the Great British Kitchen called time on the scheme after its initiators, the British Food Trust, chaired by Prue Leith, failed to fill a hole in the initial funding package caused when the Heritage Lottery Fund rejected an application for £985,000 in March 2003. One of its biggest backers, Advantage West Midlands, bought the Stafford site for more than £2m in 1999 and has since spent £1.4m on maintenance said “sydney property valuation“. This week it admitted it could not deliver its vision.

Each and everything is related to the working and requirements of the people always. No matter whether the results are given or not fees are always given to the clients at the end. The complex, on the 11ha site of the grade II listed St George’s hospital, would have comprised the world’s first national center for the culinary arts, a hotel, heritage center, restaurant, shops and a hydroponic showcasing fruit, flowers, and vegetables. It would also have offered a food-in-art gallery, a working bakery and dairy and a cookery school for children as young as five.